Author: Noah Smith

Studies show that the high level of stress endured by medical students may actually hinder one’s cognitive function and learning ability. Not to mention, research reveals that 27 percent of all medical students are depressed, with 11 percent having suicidal thoughts. If the stress and depression are not managed early on, it’s likely that it will carry on into their professional careers, which can potentially lead to early burnout. No matter how many research papers you have to write or exams to study for, the number one thing on your list should be taking care of your mental health so you don’t start exhibiting self-destructive behavior.

Avoid Falling Into a Substance Abuse Trap

Between the pressures of studies and a pile of debt from tuition, it’s not uncommon for a medical student to turn to drugs and alcohol as a coping method. Nearly a third of students report alcohol abuse, with burnout and exhaustion being the main driving factors. There’s also a correlation between the type of abuse with the field of study. For example, resident surgeons tend to abuse alcohol, while those in emergency medicine also abuse benzodiazepines, cocaine, and marijuana. While the following mental health tips can help prevent an addiction, should you find yourself hooked on a substance, it’s a good idea to get treated at a facility that specifically caters to medical professionals—even if you’re still a student. Aside from the obvious reasons, it’s important to immediately address your addiction. If it continues into your professional practice, you run the risk of having your license revoked.

Take Regular Breathers

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Written by Noah Smith

Photo courtesy of Pixabay.

Diabetes is a condition that affects the way your body processes sugar and can cause considerable health problems. There are two main types: type 1 is developed at a young age, while type 2 is more preventable. Risk factors include “a family history of diabetes, unhealthy diet, physical inactivity and high blood pressure,” states Care 2.  If you are one of the millions affected by this disease, it’s crucial that you take the time to properly care for yourself.

Here are some tips on making changes from the comfort of your own home.

Get in some workouts

Exercising regularly can vastly improve your blood sugar levels, help you lose weight, lower cholesterol, and avoid long-term complications that can accompany diabetes. According to Diabetes.co.uk, working out can even help reduce insulin sensitivity in type 1 diabetics.

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This is a guest post from Noah Smith at wellnessvoyager.com

Teens today have quite a bit to worry about, between pressures at school to perform well and fit in, the stress of figuring out higher learning and what comes next, and all the worries that come with social media. It can be difficult to know how to help when your teen begins to exhibit signs of anxiety–which can manifest into physical symptoms–but because anxiety can lead to depression and other mood disorders, it’s important to know what those warning signs are, how to help your child cope, and how to learn ways to prevent those feelings from coming back in the future.

Keeping the conversation open with your teen is a great start. That’s not always as easily done as one might hope, but showing your child that you understand what they’re going through–or are trying to–is an important part of helping her sort out her feelings, and it will help her learn to trust you.

Here are some of the best ways to help your teen with anxiety.

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